The Blog

Universal Design for Learning: The Metaphorical Ramp to Curricular Content

Teachers in elementary schools, high schools, and college classrooms alike constantly ask themselves similar questions: Why aren’t my students performing well on tests? Why aren’t my students understanding the concepts I am teaching them? Why aren’t my students meeting the requisite benchmarks? What disability does my student have that is preventing them from accessing my… Read more »

If Only College Were As Easy As Calculus: The Only Three Questions That Should Be On A College Entrance Exam

SAT’s, ACT’s, AP Courses, AP Subject Exams, test prep, causes and effects of the Russian Revolution, pythagorean theorems and quadratic equations, mitosis, and Newton’s three laws.  Fully fill in the bubble.  Triple-check the answer sheet.  Re-write the entrance essay – again. This is what we generally think of when it comes to college preparation, and… Read more »

Because We are All Family: Guaranteeing Paid Leave for New Parents at Mansfield Hall

New families and employees will often hear “Welcome to the Mansfield Family” on their first day. We don’t mean this lightly. Everything we do at Mansfield Hall is centered around building community. And, as most know, a tight community is no different than family. From our parents, to our students, our fellows, our staff, and even… Read more »

A Rally Cry for Diverse Learners Heading to College

Rise Up My Fellow Jackhammers and Set Your Sights on the Stairs that Rise Before You. The commencement of a new college year is upon us and the call to those who challenge the paradigm of these institutions is louder now than it ever has been. I call upon you, my fellow jackhammer, to rise… Read more »

Goal Setting for Students with Asperger’s Syndrome

Why goal setting takes time. Because it is a risk. Because it means saying out loud (at least to ourselves, but probably to others) that we want to change, grow, and build new skills. This takes courage. This takes hard work. This is vulnerable. We might falter, or flail, or possibly even fail. And failure… Read more »

Mansfield Hall Fellow Says Thanks

At our End of the Year Banquet last week, we allowed students to give speeches or final reflections. One of our fellows, Caitlin, asked if she could share a few words. Mansfield Hall Fellows are a unique aspect to our program. Fellows are traditional college students and volunteer to spend a year living and participating… Read more »

The Art of Building Community at Mansfield Hall

On Tuesdays at Mansfield Hall we gather as a community. Wait, read that last sentence again, because it is a big deal! On Tuesdays at Mansfield Hall we gather as a community. Community is the ground from which all our work at Mansfield Hall grows. It is the substrate of our relationships, it is the… Read more »

The Graduate Student Perspective: A Summer Internship Experience Working with Students on the Autism Spectrum

Following the completion of my first year in the Higher Education and Student Affairs Administration graduate program at The University of Vermont, I began a summer internship with Mansfield Hall, an academic and residential support program for students with a variety of learning needs, including high-functioning autism, executive function challenges, and various learning disabilities. Students… Read more »

In Defense of The Much-Maligned Helicopter Parent – And What Comes Next

The term “Helicopter Parent” was coined in the late 1960’s by Dr. Haim Ginott, who quoted a student describing his mother, who “hovers over me like a helicopter…”  Although in light use through the late 1990’s, the term’s usage gained momentum in the early 2000’s as a new generation of technology-connected young adults, raised in… Read more »